very rare and interesting 17th century 8-day religious longcase clock by John Sanderson of Wigton (Cumbria) which  dates  from  the early 1690s and is probably one of Sanderson's earliest surviving 8-day clocks (if not earliest) to come to light so far. The eleven inch square dial  has verses to the top two corners and also to the dial centre. The chapter ring markings, consists mainly of meeting arrowheads  and ' C ' scrolls  (typical for this period). The outside chapter ring numeral markings have lovely curly tails to the 5s  and the letter S (strike) which is a rally nice early feature. The chapter ring is signed ' John Sanderson of Wigton Fecit '. The date calendar is interesting in that it is set within an ' eye ' just like the primitive John Ismay clock which is also illustrated on this site. The dial  centre is very busy having ringed winding holes, ringed seconds ring, ringed date calendar and ringing around the centre arbour. Below the seconds ring there is the verse ' Memento Mori '  ( Bear Death in Mind) and in the top two corners there are verses which read ' As time and cllock and all things pass away ' and ' A mend your lives for here wee must not stay '. Sanderson has also signed his name on the reverse side of the chapter ring. The Five-finned and ringed pillar  movement which amazingly retains all of its original wheel work and collets has repeat works. It has an early form of rack striking and also has a strike silent feature.Meeting arrow heads with  'C ' scrolls, for half-hour markers plus the inclusion of the word ' of ' in his signature, are all features of John Sanderson's earliest known work, which I believe date from the early 1690s. Sanderson seems to have stopped using this type of half-hour marker about c1695 and then dropped using 'of' in his signature around c1698 when he was using a new style of half hour markers. I now know of four examples (incuding a true Lantern clock by Sanderson) that all have these features.on their chapter rings.  It is housed in a heavily built and very interesting pannelled oak case.  The trunk door is pannelled and is held in place by two primitive iron blacksmith hinges. There are two more oak panels below the trunk door and a further panel to the base.  Originally the case may have been made to match a pannelled room.

 

 

 

  ohn Sanderson was born in 1671 and was the son of  blacksmith Robert Sanderson. It is beleived that he learned his trade by serving his apprenticeship under John Ogden at Bowbridge. He was living and working as a clockmaker in Tiffinthwait (near Wigton) by 1690 and married local Quaker girl Elizabeth Pearson there in 1691. He was the founder member of what has become known as ' The Wigton School of Clockmaking '

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of

Sandd Dial  C Sand 1695 ddddd Sand 1695 3xww Sandd verse L C WED Sandd verse R C WED

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ohn Sanderson

Wigton Fecit, c1690s

' As time and cllock and all things pass away '

' A mend your lives for here wee must not stay '

' Memento Mori '

(Bear Death in Mind)

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howing a close up of the wonderfully busy dial centre.

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igned John Sanderson 'of ' Wigton Fecit

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      eeting  arrow heads with  'C ' scrolls, for half-hour markers plus the inclusion of the word ' of ' in his signature, are all features of John Sanderson's earliest known work which can date from as early as c1690.

Sanderson seems to have stopped using this type of half-hour marker about c1695 and then dropped using 'of' in his signature around c1698.

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Click Image to Supersize

Wanted

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  ohn Sanderson single handed clock Wanted.

Please Contact Lee Borrett

S444 S666

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mend your Lives, for here wee must not stay.

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 llustrated here is 17th century 8-day religious longcase clock by John Sanderson of Wigton, dating around c1695.  

howing the dial.

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all things pass away.

s time and clock and