unique eight-day clock made about c1699 by Joseph Calvert of Wigton, Cumberland - made for his own use with the assistance of John Sanderson for the dial making. This is prototye work of an exceptional nature, and of great interest in the beginnings of clockmaking in the region.

 

   oseph Calvert was born in 1654 and spent much of his life as a yeoman farmer at Longthwaite, a hamlet just south of  Wigton, where he died in 1728. Longthwaite was not a mile from Tiffinthwaite, where John Sanderson worked, and it is known from further research that the two families were aquainted. Joseph Calvert was a signatory to the inventory taken in 1690 on the death of John Sanderson senior, uncle of John Sanderson the clockmaker, who was then only nineteen years old, Calvert being thirty-six. So Calvert and Sanderson the clockmaker knew each other.

 

   he clock passed to the makers son, William Calvert in 1728 and further research suggests that the clock then passed to family friend, John Pattinson after the death of William Calvert, in 1765. The clock was re-housed in this (newly-made) beautiful red walnut case then. Interestingly when Joseph Calvert was a signatory to the will of John Sanderson senior, back in 1690 - John Pattinson was a witness to the Will. The clock stayed with the Pattinson family - in the same location right up 1995 when another member of the Pattinson family who had just inherited the clock - sadly decided to sell it!

 

 

 

 

 

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CALVERT 16o

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CALVERT 2X CALVERT 3X

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howing the wonderfully busy dial centre.

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( Joseph Calvert made this Clock )

nusually signed ' Joseph Calvert Fecit, hoc Horologi '

th century Wigton

8-day Longcase

c1699 

Fecit, hoc Horoligium

oseph Calvert

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' As hours make days '

' Soe Time Decays '

Click Image to Supersize

Brian Loomes article on this clock